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Reasons to Homeschool

A Letter to Me—Circa 2009

I’ve been homeschooling since 2009 when my oldest daughter was in the second grade, my middle daughter was three years old, and I was pregnant with my third daughter. I wish I had known then what I know now. If I could go back to 2009, here’s what I’d tell myself.

Hey there, you. So you are thinking about homeschooling, huh? Well before you make such a huge decision, you need to know the truth about homeschooling.

Why Homeschool?

Why would anybody in their right mind homeschool their children? Why would a person with a good education not work at a job that pays? Why would an adult do without the nice things that money can buy: the fun vacation, the in style clothes, the better automobile? Why would a mom stay home all day (and night) preparing, teaching, grading, planning, studying, recording, etc., instead of visiting, calling and enjoying friends? Why would a person devote all of her life to teaching her own children instead of letting someone who is trained do it?

Ten Fundamental Reasons to Homeschool

Each year at this time, I think about why I homeschool my children. It helps me remember the benefits and blessings when I am prone to feel most like a failure. It was finding a link to a recent article on the ChildrensMD website by medical doctor Kathleen Berchelmann—sharing her list of eighteen reasons why she homeschools her children—that encouraged me to not only think about, but write down my own list.

Why Do I Homeschool?

After over twenty years of homeschooling, four kids, two dogs, three high school graduations, one college graduation, one wedding and one grandchild, I think I can boil my initial motivation down to one simple answer.

How to Fail at Homeschooling in Three Easy Steps

As I have reflected on that time in our lives, I have come to realize that I took three basic steps to becoming a homeschool failure. My hope is that, in sharing my mistakes, I will speak to the heart of some other mother who finds herself gazing a little too fondly at the big yellow school bus.

Hal’s about It: Happy and We Know It

But for most of us, this is the life. It’s hard work: bothersome at times, downright troublesome days, but generally speaking—a life we’ve chosen and can’t imagine trading.

I discovered a pattern in much of the educational and policy research that confirms homeschoolers’ commitment and satisfaction.

Research Shows Homeschoolers Active in Society

Adults who were taught at home are reporting the homeschool experience has been an advantage to them in later years, and they are finding it is no detriment in college or career ambitions, according to a study just released by the National Home Education Research Institute.

HOW CAN I EDUCATE MY CHILD AT HOME? The Way It Can be Done at From Five to Ten Years of Age--Part 3

The mother in her teaching does not need much theory of education. She is not dealing with the theoretical child, but with the child as he really is.

Do not hurry the child along in number work. The secret of real progress is not in how much the learner gets in a day, but in learning a little every day, and in learning it so well that it is a part of his everlasting mental store and so clearly understood that no such thing as review is necessary.

Gaining Confidence in Our Homeschooling

This article will discuss reasons to have confidence in our homeschooling, why it is sometimes difficult to develop and maintain confidence, and how we can increase our confidence.

Inspiring Your High Schooler to Love Learning

Our number one educational goal (as opposed to spiritual goals) was to preserve the desire to learn in each of them.

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