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Homeschool History

Classifying Homeschoolers

You are a homeschooler, sure, but what KIND of homeschooler are you? What is your motive, your educational philosophy, your methodology? Educational philosophers and historians struggle to comprehend the homeschool movement because it is so diverse!  This workshop will look at some of the major frameworks educational philosophers and historians use to classify, discuss and evaluate the diversity that exists with the homeschool movement.  Understanding these frameworks, and their associated labels, in useful for developing one's own practices.

Three Homeschool Movement Founders and their Legacies

The modern homeschool movement is now 30 years old, but how did we get here?  Educational historians identify several key individuals who were instrumental in advancing the movement. These individuals came from very different backgrounds and had very different views.   Many homeschoolers, however, do not recognize their names nor their legacies. This talk will introduce and discuss the contribution of three individuals who wrote books and created organizations dedicated to promoting their own vision of education: John Holt, Raymond and Dorothy Moore and Rousa Rushdoony.   

Kevin’s Kluge: Toward a Culture of Learning

Last issue I introduced myself to you as NCHE's new president. Prior to the presidency, I served as the education vice president, and my responsibilities were focused on the education and publications committee, which produces this publication and works to keep the website current. As president, my role is greatly expanded, and I am learning more and more about and am directly involved in the hard work that occurs under the leadership of the other vice presidents. For example, the conference committee is very active year-round.

Not on Our Watch!

In mid-March, Governor Mike Easley proposed to make private, Christian and homeschools accountable to the state Department of Public Instruction (DPI). As soon as the information was verified, NCHE sent out an alert, and homeschool families responded by the thousands. The public reaction brought a delay in action;

Guard It Well

But sometimes I get a little concerned about those who don't remember our fledgling past. I worry that they might not be as careful as we were forced to be, to protect the right to teach our own children. The real danger, in a word, is that homeschooling has become mainstream (Ugh!). When a movement becomes mainstream, I contend that it is in jeopardy.